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Learn in a Different Way

The Washington Semester Program is open to all majors! Students take UGA courses, live in Delta Hall and intern full-time.

Overview

The University of Georgia's Washington Semester program provides the amazing opportunity to earn class credit while gaining valuable work experience. In DC, students can earn academic credit for their internship that they arrange through their major. Additionally, students participate in two courses in DC: one a formal lecture or discussion style class, and the other a seminar that takes students around the city. Students in the past have had access to both amazing sites and people through these seminars! For example, students have visited CIA headquarters, met with Justice Clarence Thomas and had lunch with President Morehead.

In addition to the six credit hours taught in DC, students are required to add coursework to their schedules for a minimum of 12 credit hours.  In most cases, this is achieved by the addition of internship and/or directed study coursework.

Please note: In order to earn internship and/or directed study credit in your major, you need to be admitted to that major and in most cases, are required to complete prerequisite courses.  Students are strongly encouraged to speak with their academic advisors before applying to the program.  To see what credit you may be able to receive in your major take a look at our compiled list here.

Fall 2017 Courses

WASH 3400 – The Washington Seminar

Taught by Mr. Don DeMaria, Director of the Washington Semester Program

3 credit hours

Using the expertise of UGA faculty and staff and leaders who live and work in the nation’s capital, this seminar will introduce students to various aspects of life, work and culture in Washington, DC. Specific subjects and speakers will be announced in the course syllabus.

POLS 4790- Special Topics in American Politics

Taught by Mr. Kevin M. Scott

3 credit hours

The lens through which we view American politics is increasingly a partisan lens. In this class we will discuss both the causes and consequences of political polarization, seeking to understand why politics has become so polarized and how public policy has changed as a result. We will devote time to determining whether the Trump Administration worsens, changes, or improves partisan polarization and discuss potential remedies for the challenges political polarization creates for governing. 

INTL 4770- Special Topics in International Relations

Taught by Mr. Lee Lukoff

3 credit hours

The objective of this course is to impart a deeper understanding of the history of U.S-Israel diplomatic relations. Students will learn about complex and multifaceted topics such as the historical role that the United States has played in the Middle East peace process as well as the nature of military, intelligence, and economic cooperation between the two countries.This seminar will teach students about the various ways that the countries' interests have overlapped (or diverged) at various points since 1948. The students will receive a balanced perspective on a topic that is regularly discussed in foreign policy circles in Washington, D.C. 

Spring 2018 Courses

WASH 3400 – The Washington Seminar

Taught by Mr. Don DeMaria, Director of the Washington Semester Program

3 credit hours

Using the expertise of UGA faculty and staff and leaders who live and work in the nation’s capital, this seminar will introduce students to various aspects of life, work and culture in Washington, DC. Specific subjects and speakers will be announced in the course syllabus.

POLS 4790- Special Topics in American Politics

Taught by Mr. C. Randall Nuckolls, Partner, Dentons

3 credit hours

The first year of the Trump Administration has seen many presidential executive orders, numerous law suits filed against the President's actions, a significant rollback or postponement of various adopted by the Obama Administration.   The media has focused its attention on the investigations about Russian meddling in the 2016 election and the retrenchment by President Trump from past U.S. commitment to multilateral trade and security agreements.   The interaction among the three branches of our federal government has at times seemed chaotic and infused with much heated rhetoric.  In the age of Trump the parameters of presidential authority and the proper interplay of the Executive Branch, the Congress and the Courts are being debated as never before.  The ability of our federal government to accommodate change and innovation is being tested. 

This seminar style course will discuss key laws and policies being debated during 2018 including federal budget priorities, immigration policies, the future of federal health care legislation, and U.S. trade and national security policies.  The continuing role of the U.S. Constitution in framing policy decisions will be an important focus of class discussions.  Topics will include the process for developing federal legislative initiatives, the nomination and confirmation of federal judges, the federal budget process, the changing role of the U.S. government in international treaty negotiations and the global security framework, the Federal Election Campaign Act and the impact of recent Supreme Court decisions, including Citizens United, on financing of federal elections. The role of think tanks, lobbying firms, nonprofit groups and corporations in advocating for changes in federal law will also be discussed.

INTL 4770- Special Topics in International Relations

Taught by Mr. Lee Lukoff

3 credit hours

The objective of this course is to impart a deeper understanding of the history of U.S-Israel diplomatic relations. Students will learn about complex and multifaceted topics such as the historical role that the United States has played in the Middle East peace process as well as the nature of military, intelligence, and economic cooperation between the two countries.This seminar will teach students about the various ways that the countries' interests have overlapped (or diverged) at various points since 1948. The students will receive a balanced perspective on a topic that is regularly discussed in foreign policy circles in Washington, D.C. 

 

Independently arranged directed study and/or internship courses

Washington Semester | 114 New College | Athens, GA 30602 | Phone:706-542-3450 | Fax:706-542-0544 | dcsem@uga.edu
A unit of the Office of the Vice President for Instruction